Missouri law allows for a man that has been named to be the father of the child, but is not biologically the father of the child, to petition the court to terminate a child support order that is two years old or less, and, among other things, extinguish the child support arrears. Missouri’s paternity set aside law provides that:

 

 

Upon a finding that the genetic test referred to herein was properly conducted, accurate and indicates that the person subject to the child support payment order has been excluded as the child’s father, the court shall, unless it makes written findings of fact and conclusions of law that it is in the best interests of the parties not to do so:

(1) Grant relief on the petition and enter judgment setting aside the previous judgments of paternity and support, or acknowledgment of paternity under section 210.823 only as to the child or children found not to bet the biological child or children of the petitioner;

(2) Extinguish any existing child support arrearage only as to the child or children found not to be the biological child or children of the petitioner; and

(3) Order the department of health and senior services to modify the child’s birth certificate accordingly.

A general order of child support for multiple children does not automatically preclude a trial court from setting aside at least some arrearages pursuant to law. Where the petitioner is not the father of any other unemancipated children subject to the general order and the arrearages owing that are attributable to the child at issue can be determined by competent, substantial evidence, the trial court shall set aside such arrearages, unless the trial court makes written findings of fact and conclusions of law that it is the best interests of the parties not to do so.